The Books

The Giving Tree

by Shel Silverstein

Hardcover, 57 pages

Published by Harper & Row (1964)

List Price: $17.99

Actual Price: $11.39

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Amazon Description

The Giving Tree, a story of unforgettable perception, beautifully written and illustrated by the gifted and versatile Shel Silverstein, has been a classic favorite for generations.

Since it was first published fifty years ago, Shel Silverstein's poignant picture book for readers of all ages has offered a touching interpretation of the gift of giving and a serene acceptance of another's capacity to love in return.

Shel Silverstein's incomparable career as a bestselling children's book author and illustrator began with Lafcadio, the Lion Who Shot Back. He is also the creator of picture books including A Giraffe and a Half, Who Wants a Cheap Rhinoceros?, The Missing Piece, The Missing Piece Meets the Big O, and the perennial favorite The Giving Tree, and of classic poetry collections such as Where the Sidewalk Ends, A Light in the Attic, Falling Up, Every Thing On It, Don't Bump the Glump!, and Runny Babbit.

And don't miss Runny Babbit Returns, the new book from Shel Silverstein!

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Comments

1Posted by: .(JavaScript must be enabled to view this email address) on 01/04

I think The Giving Tree is a good book because the tree is so loving to the boy and the boy is a little bit selfish because on page 17 the boy came to the tree when he was older and said “I want some money. Can you give me some money?” And how do you expect a tree to have money but the tree gave the boy her apples so he could sell the apples and have money.

2Posted by: .(JavaScript must be enabled to view this email address) on 02/23

I received this book as a gift and was so surprised that my four-year-old twin boys LOVE it.  On appearance, it just doesn’t look like a book that would appeal to two car, gun, volcano, dinosaur loving boys yet they are captivated by it. And so am I.

3Posted by: .(JavaScript must be enabled to view this email address) on 04/17

This book needs to be in every home.  It is a very important book. Full of hope, love and purpose. If you haven’t read it you need to.  It’s definetly for everyone.  ILOVEIT

4Posted by: .(JavaScript must be enabled to view this email address) on 04/17

I was introduced to this book in a graduate psychology class and it was used as a learning tool. After having two children it took on a whole new dimension but never lost its lesson even by a 4 year old.

5Posted by: .(JavaScript must be enabled to view this email address) on 04/19

Can someone please explain to me what is so great about this book.  It seems to me to teach that it’s okay for a boy/man to be selfish and especially take from nature.  Yes, it may be amusing, but it’s not teaching a lesson I want my kids learning.  If the boy gave to the tree…  planting pretty flowers around it.. whatever it would make all the difference.  Agree or disagree?

6Posted by: .(JavaScript must be enabled to view this email address) on 04/19

You have missed the entire point of this book.  It is not about the boy.  It is about the giving tree. 
The boy is thoughtless and selfish.  The lesson is not to be like him.
The tree is loving and forgiving to the end.
The lesson is to be like the tree.

7Posted by: .(JavaScript must be enabled to view this email address) on 04/19

Does anyone else think like me that in this story the tree could be an analogy for God and the selfish, immature boy is the human race? Or and analogy for parent and child?

8Posted by: .(JavaScript must be enabled to view this email address) on 04/19

christy     that’s exactly why i love the book.smile  No matter how self centered i am. God always loves. He is always happy just to give to his children.  Also the parent/child relationship. We only want their happiness and would do anything for them. The book is an honest look at ourselves.  so yea…. i agree   smile

9Posted by: .(JavaScript must be enabled to view this email address) on 04/19

I loved this book growing up, I have purchased it for my daughter. I think the message is more about giving with out asking in return and giving because you know it’s bringing joy to that person. I think Brooke is just a pessimist

10Posted by: .(JavaScript must be enabled to view this email address) on 04/19

Thanks, Christy!  Your analogy is perfect.  Anyone who is familiar with the work of Shel Silverstein would understand that this where he is coming from.
If the lesson of the book cannot be understood by someone—-then no amount of “explaining” will make it clear to them.

11Posted by: .(JavaScript must be enabled to view this email address) on 12/13

The tree is the parent. The boy is our children.

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